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Threats

There are many threats to the Temperate Deciduous Forest Biome. One of many major threats to the Temperate Deciduous Forest Biome is air pollution. Air pollution is created by many things we use everyday i.e. automobiles, gas stoves, gas heaters, even when the guy on the corner lights up. Ever walk by the big factory downtown? Look up, see the smoke coming out of the smokestack? Whoa, lotıs of air pollution there. Air pollution is caused by carbon monoxide, which all of the above create.

Logging is another major threat. Millions of trees are cut down every day. Most often the logs are taken to paper mills where, while processing the paper, more air pollution is created. Logging, while it appears to only harm the Temperate Deciduous Forest, will eventually catch up with us unless the human population faces the imminent truth: NO TREES/PLANTS, NO AIR.

Trees create carbon dioxide, something which is a vital necessity for any life form. Humans armed with their gas guzzling 12 m.p.g. Suburbans, create exactly the opposite. We create more and more carbon monoxide everyday, while cutting down more and more trees so that less and less carbon dioxide is created. The Temperate Deciduous Forest has been reduced by more than 90%.

Another major threat is the over-development and mass population of the Temperate Deciduous Forest. Some of the worldıs largest cities are in the Temperate Deciduous Forest. Since the population in the Temperate Deciduous Forest grows every day itıs no wonder that small rural villages grow into a vast, sprawling, metropolitan areas virtually overnight. Although fires strike and burn down Temperate Deciduous Forests they replenish the soil with the nutrients they need. But burnt forests also give money hungry developers the opportunity they want, to buy land dirt cheap and then build some vast condo complex. Other small threats are acid rain which hurts plant growth, thus harming wildlife and hunting which slowly, but steadily depletes wildlife.


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